CELLBASED FUR, WOOL  AND POLYMERS

“BIOPRINTED” SKIN AND HAIR

(colloquially known as fur)

Join us on our fascinating journey to take out fur farming, wool production and leather products
of the agriculture equation.
We’ve started our -self funded- (ad-) venture in late 2017 with the idea to use our IP on how to grow and scale human hairfollicles inseparable attached to surrounding skin tissue and translate these methods to laboratory grown biomaterials such as fur, wool and leather.
 
 
 
BRIGHTLIGHT PICTURE OF HAIRFOLLICLES GROWING OUT OF THE BIOPRINTED SKIN CONSTRUCT
 
H&E STAINING OF OUR HAIRFOLLICLE INSEPARABLY ATTACHED TO A BIOPRINTED SKIN CONSTRUCT
 

HOW TO „BIOPRINT“ FUR

(full copyright FUROID™️)


Here we display some images of various prototypes, including SEM and confocal images of stainings, obtained whilst the proof of concept phase. We can’t help but recognizing the art like beauty of nature [with a slight tweak towards our direction].

 

COMPOSTABLE FAUX-FUR, FAUX-WOOL

(and YARNS)


Based on our latest consortium participation in a project aiming to develop technologies for the production of 100% compostable electrospun biopolyesters, we will apply this knowledge to produce 100% compostable FAUX-FUR, FAUX-WOOL and YARNS.


SEM IMAGE OF ELECTROSPUN NANOFIBERS
 
 


CELLBASED WOOL

(Ovis Aries- Sheep)


Our hair, and that of any mammal, is surprisingly complex. No substitute (e.g., faux fur or faux wool) has been able to replicate fully the desirable material properties of hair, wool or fur. Largely this is because the advantages of wool (and other mammalian hairs) over synthetic and plant-based fibres are locked up in specific organised combinations of structure and proteins. Our approach is to use cutting-edge techniques in which multiple single stem cells are brought together in the right conditions so that they spontaneously grow into a three-dimensional miniature tissue (called an organoid), in this case a wool follicle.


 
SEM IMAGE OF WOOL SURFACE CUTICLE (LEICHESTER)
 

MINK AND COVID-19 

 

From the end of April, mink have tested positive with COVID-19 at dozens of mink farms in the Netherlands. It is also likely that mink have transmitted the virus to employees. Mandatory coronavirus screening is conducted among mink farms and infected farms are culled.
Wageningen Bioveterinary Research (WBVR) tested the animals positive for the coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Other animals, such as cats, may also be susceptible to this virus.

Frequently asked questions and answers about coronavirus in mink in the Netherlands, the research currently being conducted and coronavirus in other kept animals are to be found in the RESOURCES section of our website.

Can mink transmit the virus to humans?

It is plausible that employees were infected with the coronavirus by mink. The Dutch government stated this on May 19 and 25. Further investigation of the increasing number of infected mink farms has shown that many of the employees surveyed were infected with coronavirus (more than 50 percent). Based on the genetic building blocks of the virus, it was possible to establish for some of these employees that this virus was similar to the virus that circulated among the minks on the farm. On this basis, it can be concluded that many of these people are very likely to be directly or indirectly infected by the mink.

©WBVR
 
© ORESHKOVA et al. 2020 LUNG SECTION (H&E STAINED) OF A DECEASED MINK